Memories of Mexicali


As I get ready to leave Mexicali, I am posting several old postcards of the city.  Today’s post is more reflective of the many changes going on now – but we’ll be back to our usual topics soon..

this one is just a few years old

I’m sure that my regular readers can tell that parting is ‘such bittersweet sorrow’.. How could it not be  – when I have met such wonderful people, learned so much and made some great friends?

Mexicali – Av..Revolucion – circa 1960’s

At the same time, I am excited about moving forward – school, studying in Bogotá, and working on my research.

Governmental Palace (now part of UABC) circa 1960’s

Hard to leave the hospital in particular.  I went back there yesterday and got to see some of the people who were so welcoming, starting on my very first day.  (When I was still struggling – particularly with the regional accent here – which differs from the Spanish I was used to hearing.)

Av. Lopez Mateos

It was great to be back in the operating room with Dr. Ochoa.  With classes in Nashville, and my homework assignments, I hadn’t seen him for a couple of weeks.

I know I will miss him most of all even if I am embarrassed to admit it.  He will always rank up there as one of the world’s great “bosses”; he was great to be around; day after day after day- which is not something you can say about most people.   I know I’ve talked about what a good (and patient!) professor he has been, but this last month, when we’ve been collaborating on the book, has changed the dynamic a bit.  He’ll still always be ‘my professor’ and a surgical colleague – but now that we have worked together in a different capacity – he is more of a friend too.  (I’ve actually called him by his first name a couple of times, which is a hard thing for me to do..)

I think, too, that is was a little-bit eye-opening for him to be more involved on the writing (and researching) side of things.  I hope he enjoyed it as much as I have.  (He should – he did all the research on Mexicali’s nightlife.. )

and Joanna – who has become one of my best friends.. (Not just my best friend in Mexicali – but someone I consider a really close friend – anytime, anywhere..)  It just seems like we connect and communicate on that level that only really close friends ever do.. Despite different backgrounds, I feel like I’ve known her my whole life..  So it’s hard to say “see you later” to Joanna.. (“See you later” is so much better than goodbye, don’t you think?)

So of course, as you can imagine – I spent my last day at the hospital – in the place I love the most: the operating room.

Dr. Rivera (left) and Dr. Ochoa

I’m going to miss my ‘movie star’ surgeon too – Dr. Rivera has been great about being in all my pictures and film clips..  He’s a nice young resident – (still grounded)  and I think he’s be a great surgeon when he finishes his training..  He’s interested in surgical oncology – so we might be writing about him again in a few years..

 

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Kim Kardashian: Better call your lawyers..


As I mentioned previously – the ‘unauthorized’ use of celebrity images is pretty common around here.  We talked about this before in conjunction to Kim Kardashian and Rhianna – and today, while driving around Mexicali taking pictures for a section of the book on architecture, we saw yet another example of this.  (Sorry, Kim – we were in traffic, and seeing it was unexpected, so the photo is blurry – and I know, my window is filthy) – but it’s undeniably you hawking clothing up on a sign outside a clothing store on Blvd Anahuac..  Just thought you should know..

Kim Kardashian hawking cheap clothing in Mexico

In other news – spent the day trying to find the elusive “casa de Louis Vuitton” which is a house of the outskirts of Mexicali painted brown with symbols to look like a Louis Vuitton bag.  I know the house is still there – yesterday one of the people who lived near the house was lamenting being a neighbor – but the address and directions were far from correct..

I did get some more great photos of Mexicali.. including one of the fancy car dealerships down here.. (I like to remind people that Mexicali has one of the highest standards of living, and income in all of Baja)..  There is a growing middle-class here (and just like most of us), they like nice things..  It’s another side of the road photos since I wasn’t planning on taking pictures of car dealerships..

Mercedes Benz dealership

A lot more photos but I haven’t gotten around to sorting of all them yet..More architectural adventures tomorrow..

 

 

 

as the mercury soars..


into the 110’s (and higher) it’s been an interesting week in Mexicali.  I’ve definitely entered new territory in my book writing venture.  In the last books, I basically didn’t see the forest for the trees – meaning that even as I raced around, and enjoyed the cities I was living in – I didn’t include any of the information about the cities themselves.. Just the surgeons, and surgery.

In retrospect – I think that was a mistake.  While I know the beautiful multifaceted Bogotá, my readers don’t.  At the time, I didn’t want to duplicate the efforts of the many talented travel writers out there.  But on consideration – living in a city is so much different from visiting one.   It takes months to see and fully appreciate the nuance of many locations – especially cities..  Anyone can talk about the historic church built in 19 whatever, but it takes time and familiarity to see the beauty of Mexicali’s Graceland, or the changing canvas of the UABC museum.  It takes time to collect the stories that bring the city to life.  So now, I am trying to do that – in a small fashion with everything I’ve collected since coming here in March.

I am not Frommer’s.. I am more like his awkward, quirky little cousin. I don’t have the manpower or the resources to talk about the hundreds of restaurants here (more than 100 Chinese restaurants alone!) but I can tell you some of my favorite places; for a casual lunch with friends, or a night on the town.  I can’t give exhaustive listings on all there is to see and do in this thriving city, but I can show you the heart of it.  I can tell you about the things that make Mexicali more than just spot in the hard-baked earth; the things that make this city real, and make it a fascinating place to be.  I can make your stay; whether just a few days, weeks or months; interesting and informative.

It’s been a fascinating and amazing journey to discover these ‘pockets of life’ and living history – and now that I am outside my realm (of medicine and surgery) one that would have been impossible without the numerous people who have embraced me, and shared their wisdom.  (It’s becoming quite the list – and I’ll share it with you all soon.)

But I certainly hope that my future readers enjoy the journey as much as I have.

How’s the book coming?


I was in the United States most of last week (at my reunion) but I didn’t stop working.  While a reunion may not seem like the most ideal situation for a medical writer – it’s actually a great opportunity to talk to people and get their opinions about health care, medicine and surgery.  After the first few minutes of catching up – talk naturally turns to everyday life, and for many of us – ‘everyday life’ involves worrying about the health of our families.. Also, many of my classmates – and old friends have been some of my biggest supporters of the blog (and my other work) so it was good to get some critical feedback.

Bret Harte class reunion

The book is coming along – almost continuous writing at this point.  While I (always!) want more interviews with more surgeons, I am now at the point where I am filling in some gaps  – talking about the city of Mexicali itself.  So I am visiting museums, archives, and talking to residents about Mexicali so I can provide a more complete picture to readers.  Right now, I would really like some information about 1920’s -30’s Mexicali – I can find a lot of interesting stuff about Tijuana, but Mexicali is proving more elusive.

It’s a bit of a change from my usual research – finding out about decades old scandals (even local haunted houses), visiting restaurants and nightclubs, but it’s been a lot of fun., even if it seems frivolous or silly at times.  I hope readers enjoy this glimpse into Mexicali’s rich history as much as I have.

Finished the cover – which to me, is critical at this point.  (I use the cover to inspire me when it comes to the less than thrilling stage of copy editing) so I am posting an image here.

cover for the new book

Meeting with an architect later this week – to learn about, and write about some of the variety of styles here in Mexicali.  (There is such a surprising array – I thought it would be nice for readers to have a chance to know a bit more.)

Now there’s one house I’ve dubbed “Mexicali’s Graceland.”  I don’t know why Graceland comes to mind every time I go past this home (it looks nothing like Elvis’ home in Memphis) but the term has stuck.  I am hoping to get some of the history on this house because it just looks like a place where even the walls have stories to tell.

The pictures aren’t the most flattering – but I’ll post one so you can tell me what you think.  (It’s actually far more lovely in person – with the contrast between the pink walls and the white scrollwork, as well as some of the more classic design features.) I guess my imagination tends to run away with me – with images of grandeur and elegant ladies sipping champagne in the marbled halls of the past – but then – most of my usual writing is technical in nature, so I have few outlets for my creativity.

Mexicali’s Graceland

Meeting with my co-writer today to go back to the archives..

In the operating room with Dr. Enrique Davalos Ruiz, Neurosurgeon


Dr. Enrique Davalos Ruiz, Neurosurgeon

Spent the morning in the operating room with Dr. Davalos.  As we discussed in a previous post, Dr. Davalos is one of just a few neurosurgeons here in Mexico to specialize in both adult and pediatric neurosurgery procedures.  He performs a wide range of procedures such surgery for cerebral tumors, spinal bifida, hydrocephalus, trauma, spinal surgery and epilepsy.  But one of the procedures he is best-known for here in Mexicali is the surgical repair of craniosynostosis.  However, if you’ve ever watched this intricate procedure – ‘repair’ really isn’t the word that comes to mind to describe the procedure.  ‘Rebuild’ is much more appropriate.

Craniosynostosis is a congenital cranial deformity caused by the premature fusion of the cranial sutures.  (These sutures allow for the babies head to be slightly compressed during natural childbirth).  Many new moms can attest that their neonate’s head was temporarily ‘squashed’ looking at birth, but normalize over the first few days as the bones relax into their natural position.  In normal development, these sutures (or ridges where the bones come together) are not yet fused  – and fuse over the first few months of life.

When the bones that comprise the skull fuse early, it can result in a significant cranial abnormality.  (Luckily, in most cases of [primary] craniosynostosis – the patient’s brain functions normally despite this.)

To treat this surgically, Dr. Davalos had to essentially rebuild part of the skull (the coronal sections of the parietal and frontal bones).   He did this by removing and reshaping the skull in separate sections and then rejoining the pieces to conform to a more natural shape.  (As a someone who sews, it reminded me of lacing a corset to get curved shaping).   In a child of this age – the bones should fuse/ heal within approximately six weeks – with no long term limitations for activities.

Sterility was maintained during the case, and everything proceeded in a rapid and appropriate fashion.  Anesthesia was proficient during the case, with excellent hemodynamic stability and oxygenation.

Dr. Davalos beveling a portion of the skull

Dr. Enrique Davalos Ruiz, MD

Pediatric and Adult Neurosurgery specialist

Calle B No 248

entre Av. Reforma and Obregon

Zona Centro

Mexicali, B. C.

In the OR with Dr. Ramos & Talking with Dr. Enrique Davalos Ruiz, Neurosurgeon


Interesting day today – as I travelled across a wide range of specialties in just a few short blocks.  I started out this afternoon in thoracic surgery with the good doc seeing patients in clinic, then off to IMSS to watch a Whipple procedure (pancreatoduodenectomy) with Dr. Gabriel Ramos.   (The Whipple procedure would be the ‘open heart’ surgery of the general/ oncology surgery specialty – it’s a complex, complicated and involved procedure – so, naturally, I loved every minute of it!)

Dr. Gabriel Ramos & Dr. Maria Rivera

Some of you will recognize the absolutely delightful Dr. Maria Rivera from one of our pictures last week (on facebook) – in which she was an absolute stunner.

Not an everyday photo – but then that case was pretty breathtaking too – (when I finish writing about it, I will post a link.)

Dr. Elias Garcia Flores, who I met briefly last week was there too.. (Of course, I didn’t recognize him since he had a mask on this time.)

Unfortunately, I couldn’t stay because I had a previous appointment to interview Dr. Enrique Davalos Ruiz, a local neurosurgeon.  He turned out to very charming and interesting..

He’s the only neurosurgeon specializing in pediatric and adult neurosurgeon for all of Baja California and Sonora.  (I’ll write more about him soon – I am hoping to head to the operating room with him next week.) He’s pretty busy working at IMSS and Hospital General de Mexicali, in addition to private practice but he didn’t seem to mind taking time to talk to me.

Mexicali book: New co-author


As much as I have adored working with my previous co-author, Dr. Albert Klein, PharmD on two previous editions – it just wasn’t practical for this title.  He’s now living and working in North Carolina, whereas – I don’t know when (and if) I’ll be returning to my beloved southern Virginia, which makes this sort of collaboration more difficult.  Also, Dr. Klein, (by the nature of his background) is more of an expert on Colombian history, culture and Bogotá life than the rest of Latin America.  (I always feel that the best way to get a glimpse of life is through the eyes of those who have lived it.)

But I do want to sincerely thank Albert for everything – (without him, I might not have been brave enough to publish at all!)  It’s been a pleasure working with him – both on the books and in the hospital, so hopefully we can collaborate again in the future (Medellin, perhaps?)

In the meantime, I have a new co-author for the latest book, the ‘mini-gem’ guide to Mexicali.  While it’s a more breezy style book compared to my other offerings, I still feel very fortunate to have enlisted some local assistance for the sections on culture, Mexicali life and local color.  The input has been invaluable for me during the writing process – and will prove to be the same for readers, (I hope!)

I am also hoping to get a few additional contributors for other sections of the book to talk about issues in their respective areas of expertise.  (It may be free but that doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be a quality product and a good read.)   It’s not a done deal – and it may be difficult due to everyone’s busy schedules etc – but I am hoping it all comes together.

Once I get all of the specifics nailed down  – I’ll post more about it here.

The rest of the book is going well – I am probably about 75% complete (and then the dreaded editing process!!)  Depending on how horrible editing is – and time limitations – determines whether or not the Mexicali book becomes a e-book.  (I find the e-book conversion process endlessly frustrating, particularly for a die-hard fan of footnotes like myself.)