Days of Summer


cautionary tale for my on-line friends in another botched surgery case in Florida.

Let the buyer beware:

In the most recent case, four individuals have been arrested for impersonating surgeons and operating an unlicensed surgery clinic. According to the media reports, only one of the four people charged is a licensed physician, nurse or other trained healthcare provider – but that didn’t stop them from performing major operations such as liposuction and abdominoplasty procedures on their unknowing patients.  While Dr. William Marrocco* was the doctor on record for the clinic – patients report that he wasn’t the one operating!

scalpel

Unlike many of the ‘chop shops” we’ve written about that take place in garages, motels and private ‘parties’, in this scenario, unwary consumers were duped by a savvy group of criminals who had owned and operated the “Health and Beauty Cosmetic Surgery” clinic in downtown West Palm Beach.

*The good doctor Marrocco remains a legally licensed doctor in the state of Florida – though interestingly enough – he does not have prescriptive privileges.  One the Florida Department of Health website, Dr. Marrocco (whose secondary address corresponds with the clinic address) reports active licenses in Virginia, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Indiana and Nebraska.

But let’s check it out… so I did my own preliminary online search –

Virginia: No records found.  No active or past licensees (expired in the last five years) found.  So he may have had one – but not recently.

Pennsylvania: William Charles Marrocco held a license in Pennsylvania for a brief two-year period between 1998 to 2000. This includes his period of medical residency training at Temple University Hospital.

Michigan: Three expired licenses – one for student status (resident) and one as a pharmacist.

Indiana: Dr. Marrocco was a licensed plastic surgeon in the state of Indiana from 2000 to 2011 and has a notation “reinstatement pending‘.  Maybe Dr. Marracco is planning on heading back to Indiana – where his license remains unblemished – despite the scandal surrounding the 2003  death of his wife after he performed liposuction on her).  License # 01052282A

Nebraska:  Expired, license #2909, educational license permit (training) affiliated with Indiana University

Jorge Nayib Alarcon Zambrano – (one of the individuals charged) is listed as a member of the Colombian Society of Plastic Surgeons – from Cali, Colombia.  So he may be a trained surgeon, just not a very good one (and not licensed in the United States).

Licensing isn’t everything..

Kind of goes to show some of the pitfalls of relying on licensing boards for consumer protection.  Dr. William Marrocco was a licensed plastic surgeon, but that’s little consolation for many patients at that West Palm Beach clinic.

In fairness to Dr. William Marrocco, Jorge Alarcon and the other individuals in the case – they have been charged with multiple counts, but have not been convicted of any crime.  Until that time, they remain innocent until proven guilty.

Apologies to my loyal readers for the long lapse in posts but my plate has been pretty full.  But I will be finishing my latest assignment in a few weeks and starting a couple of new projects for the summer months.

airplane3

I applied for and received a new assignment from Examiner.com to expand my focus to include more than just health topics.  Now I will be able to write more articles focusing on life and culture in Latin America.

Colombia Moda 2014

To kick-start my new assignment, I have applied to attend Colombia Moda 2014.

(official image from Colombia Moda / Inexmoda)

As many of you already know, I was able to attend last year – and got a fascinating glimpse into the fashion industry and the future of both fashion and consumerism.

Last year’s speakers were promoting the concept of “re-shoring” and changing from the traditional ‘seasonal’ lines and collections to an ongoing, evolving fashion line with new designs and items being designed, developed and sold to the public in shorter mini cycles.

dsigners

This year – I’ll be able to cover all of this – along with interviews with individual designers, fashion lines and the Colombian fashion and textile industry.  (Last year, my articles were focused on the role between fashion and plastic surgery).

Fashion is so intrinsic to Colombian life, and many parts of Latin America, so I am really excited about it.  It plays such an important role in the economic, social and an even personal lives of many Colombians.

sew

I won’t have an assistant this year – but I am getting a new lens for the event (I will be journalist/ photographer for the event).

After Colombia Moda, I will be flipping back and forth between writing about culture and my ‘usual’ medicine and health storylines.

I will be staying in Colombia for several weeks as well as covering the Latin American Association of Thoracics (ALAT) conference at the end of July.   It’s one of the biggest international conferences in thoracic medicine/ surgery with many of the legends of thoracic surgery planning to be in attendance.

Sponsors del Congreso ALAT 2014

In August, I’ll be heading across the globe to interview the head of an innovative surgical program.

I’ll be checking in along the way – and posting photos, interviews and articles as I go.

 

Advertisements

The Sincelejo Diaries


 

Sincelejo from the balcony

Sincelejo from the balcony

 

Since I have very limited wi-fi while in Sincelejo, I have been keeping a diary of my time on the cardiac surgery service of Dr. Cristian Barbosa.  But then again, maybe I should explain why I am here.

I came to Colombia to learn how to perform skip harvesting saphenectomies with Dr. Barbosa.  As I mentioned previously, we’ve kept in contact since we first met, and he was gracious enough to offer to teach me.

Before I ever left Virginia, it took a lot of paperwork and diplomacy, but we were able to secure administrative permissions for me to study sapheneous vein harvesting with Dr. Barbosa at the hospital in Sincelejo.  While this isn’t medical tourism, I thought my readers might enjoy hearing about daily life as part of Dr. Barbosa’s cardiac surgery service.

 

 Cardiac Surgery in Sucre, Colombia

 

outside the operating room

outside the operating room

While the cardiac surgery program is located in Hospital Santa Maria, Dr. Barbosa and his team often travel to nearby hospitals and clinics to see new consultations.  This program is the only program in the state of Sucre and patients come from all parts of the state.

Many of the patients come from tiny pueblos of a few hundred (or thousand people).  Many others come from impoverished backgrounds.  (Colombia has a tiered health care system with a national health care plan for people from lower socio-economic classes, kind of similar to the Medicaid concept.)

We arrive in Sincelejo on Monday, March 24th in the evening.  We have a busy day tomorrow and the doctor wants to get started early (without facing the 3 hour drive in the morning.)

En Familia

In Sincelejo, we live en familia, in a large airy apartment with big windows that overlook much of Sincelejo.  There are four of us here, the surgeon, the anesthesiologist (who is Director of the program), the perfusionist and myself.  Iris and I share a large room with a private balcony.  Meals are shared and we usually travel as a group to the hospital and on errands.

After our arrival Monday evening, the doctor, the perfusionist and I head to the largest grocery store and shopping center in town.  We shop as a family, picking out fruit, arepa corn flour, coffee and other essentials.   We then head to the food court.  (They are treating me to Corral, due to my proclaimed love of Corral’s famed hamburgers).   

It sounds like it could be uncomfortable – this domestic scene with my boss and the cardiac surgery team, but surprisingly it isn’t.  Iris, the perfusionist (and my roommate both here and in Cartagena) always says they are a “cardiac surgery family,” and it feels that way – in a comforting, cozy way.

I joke and call Dr. Barbosa, “Papa” as he is the natural father figure of the group, and somehow it feels appropriate.

 

'Papa' of our cardiac surgery team

‘Papa’ of our cardiac surgery team

25 March 2014 – Tuesday

Today we travelled to Corozal to see two consultations in the intensive care unit.  Then we returned to Sincelejo to see another patient at another hospital, Maria Reina.  We eat lunch at the apartment, en familia .  Afterwards, we go back to the office to see patients before heading off to surgery.  (We had to delay surgery for several hours because the patient decided to eat breakfast.  I guess s/he was hungry too).

barbosa 081

 

Finally after this delay (to prevent anesthesia complications), we head to the operating room.  There are the typical delays while the patient is being prepped and prepared.  This gives me a chance to get to know the rest of the crew, Anita (the instrumentador or surgical tech) who runs the operating room table, Raquel, an experienced instrumentador who is training to work in the cardiac suite, and the two circulating nurses,  Patricia and Estebes.

Raquel (right) and Anita, the instrumentadors

Raquel (right) and Anita, the instrumentadors

The circulating nurses are responsible for taking care of all the duties that fall outside of the sterile field, like fetching additional supplies, medications or instruments.  They also control the environment by regulating the temperature, and adjust the electronic machinery (like the electrocautery unit, or the sternal saw) according to the surgeon’s immediate needs and specifications.

Patricia and Estebes, circulating nurses

Patricia and Estebes, circulating nurses

Dr. Salgua is the medical doctor who works in the office, seeing patients and assessing their medical (nonsurgical needs.) For the last year, she has also worked as Dr. Barbosa’s First Assistant in Surgery.  If there is any chance for friction in the operating room, most likely it will come from her.  I am cautiously nice but optimistic when I realize she is fairly quiet, and not overly aggressive.  (I relax, but just a bit.  I am still nervous about how the team will take to me, even though the common Oops! “accidental” needle stick scenario seems unlikely here.

Dr. Salgua

Dr. Salgua

 

Everyone is very friendly and welcoming and even before starting the actual surgery, I am breathing easier and starting to think that maybe I could belong here, with this group.

The surgery went well (valve replacement and annuloplasty).  After the surgery, we transport the patient to the intensive care unit and give report to the doctors and nursing waiting to assume care of the patient.

Note: patient did well and went home on POD # 3 on 3/28/2014.

 

26 March 2014 – Wednesday

More surgery today, but still no coronaries (and thus no saphenectomies).  It was a great day in the operating room – I closed the sternal incision..  (BTW, surgery went beautifully).  I am already starting to feel more at home with the operating room staff, and I feel like they don’t mind having me around.  Dr. Salgua has been very kind in assisting me during procedures, which is a relief.  She still stays pretty quiet during the cases, but I think maybe sometimes she is a bit nervous too.

 

with the team

with the team

After transferring the patient to the ICU, our second visit to the patient from yesterday finds her over in the general surgery ward.  (This morning she had been sitting up in a chair in the ICU when we arrived.)  She looks good and states she is sore, but otherwise fine.

barbosa 082

The cardiac catheterization lab calls; there are four cath films they want us to review, and patients to discuss regarding surgery.  The patients themselves are resting in the recovery area after the cath procedure, so our administrative assistant, Paola makes appointments for each of them and instructs them to bring their families, medications and any questions.

The most interesting part of the cath lab is who is doing the caths.  It’s a nurse, while the cardiologist sits behind the protective radiation shielded glass enclosure viewing the films and calling out for additional views.  I wonder if the nurse knows that in the United States, a similar position would pay over 100,000 dollars.  But this is one of the things that I see a lot of her in Colombia and in Mexico.  Well trained nurses being essentially nurse practitioners (making diagnoses, treating disease, performing invasive procedures) but without the status or the compensation.

My roommate and I talk about this disparity sometimes.  She’s a master’s trained nurse herself, so it makes for some very interesting discourse and insights. (She doesn’t like to have her picture taken, so I haven’t.)

We finish seeing patients and head home.  The doctors head off for a siesta.  Dr. Barbosa has been up since before five for his daily exercise before surgery.

As for me – after some scouting of the immediate areas around the hospital and the apartment, I went on my motorcycle tour.  It was great fun but I got an important reminder of the perils of motorcycles just a few days later.

Note: After and uneventful surgery (defect repair), patient recuperated quickly, and was discharged 3/29/2014.

 

27 March 2014 – Thurday

The week is really flying by.  I’ve been having fun with the operating room team.  They are a great group. Everyone has been extremely nice and welcoming.  (You can never be sure how your presence is going to be tolerated or change the existing dynamic.)   Dr. Melano and I have a couple of animated discussions over current practices, literature and recent meta-analyses.  It’s an enjoyable discourse even though my vocabulary often fails me.  I hear myself making grammatic mistakes and repeated errors in Spanish but it seems with some much going on (reviewing my anatomy, practicing my suture ties, assisting in the operating room and trying to keep up on my writing )- I just can’t seem to remember as much as I should in Spanish.  I inwardly cringe when I substitute ‘conocer’ for ‘saber’ yet again, but the word is out of my mouth in reply to a question before I can corect myself.

Dr. Salgua assists Dr. Barbosa

Dr. Salgua assists Dr. Barbosa

I sit out this surgery (still no coronaries) and spend some time taking pictures to document my experiences here.  I got a couple of shots that I really like, including one of Dr. Barbosa, Dr. Salgua and Raquel.

one of my favorite pictures from that day

one of my favorite pictures from that day

 Note:  Patient discharged home 3/29/2014.

28 March 2014 Friday (and coronaries!)

Today is my big day – and I am excited and a little scared too.  I got up at five this morning and went with Dr. Barbosa to the exercise park, so I would have a place to walk while he played tennis.  It helped me get ready for the day, and I got to see where Dr. Barbosa uses up all of his pent-up aggression.  He turns it into a power slam. (I don’t know tennis terms, but whatever swing he was doing – it must be responsible for his tranquil overall demeanor.)

After breakfast, we head to the hospital.  We check on our hospitalized patients before going to see today’s surgical patient in pre-op.

Our patient is a bit fragile-looking so (of course!) I worry about her and how she will do with surgery.   I also worry that I might not sew straight, now that it’s time for me to get to work.

Some of my previous OR “lessons” have been brutal, including several at a troubled facility that sent me running away from cardiac surgery (of all kinds) for several months*.  This is what fuels my anxiety.  (I am not anxious by nature).

But here in Sucre, in this OR,  this experience is nothing of the sort – Dr. Barbosa is an excellent teacher.  I don’t know why it’s a surprise.  He’s always been a bit of a  Clark Kent of the operating room; pleasant, calm and methodical.**  This is just the same.  In his soft burring voice he goes over the procedure with Dr. Salgua and I.  The he oversees our attempts, gently encouraging and coaxing.  It is yet again, a comfortable experience, instead of a traumatizing, horrible one.

a pretty great teacher

a pretty great teacher

 

I don’t have any pictures which would show my twinkling eyes which are the main indication of my happy grin beneath my mask as I finished closing the last leg incision.

We wrap the leg when we finish and move up to the ‘top’ of the operating room table.  (I’ve learned that the top and the bottom of the operating room table are two very different places.)

I close the chest incision – surgery is over.   We transfer the patient to the ICU.  She remains a little fragile but has no immediate problems.

barbosa 047

After making sure the patient is stable, the team heads over to Clinica Maria Reina.  We have received a call that a trauma patient is being placed on ECMO (to support his lungs) after developing a fat embolism.  We are standing by to help, as needed.

As I look around, and talk to the staff, I find that there are three patients in the small ICU, all young men in their twenties, all intubated with critical injuries, all due to motorcycle accidents.  One patient, just barely an adult has lost a limb as well.  He is awake and hitting the siderails with his remaining hand to capture the nurse’s attention.  She holds his hand and speaks soft to him and he calms down.  Watching this, along with the patient struggling to survive as doctors rush to connect ECMO is a sobering reminder of how devastating my joyride could have been.

The patient is connected to ECMO without incident.  As a weary unit, all four of us return home.

Cartagena 004

The view from my private dance floor..

Everyone is exhausted – but I am exhilarated!  I just want to dance – so I do, by myself, on the balcony with my phone blaring out some music.  Later that evening, we go out for dinner to celebrate a successful week.  I am still in a joyous dancing mood which probably drives my companions a little crazy but it’s been such a great day..  so when we return home, I dance some more.

March 29th, 2014 – Saturday

In the morning after my dancing spree – Dr. Barbosa and I walk down to the hospital.  Our fragile patient from yesterday is doing okay, and our other two patients are ready to go home.  I review discharge instructions with each patient, and hope that I am not mangling my Spanish too badly. But they seem to understand me, so maybe I am doing alright.  The doctor is nearby, writing prescriptions, to clarify anything I have trouble explaining.

One patient asks about getting out of a chair without using his arms (and stressing the sternal incision) so I demonstrate my favorite technique, and together we practice.

After we finish, we head back to the apartment to eat breakfast, finish packing and head back to Cartagena.  Dr. Melano is staying behind (along with Dr. Salgua, who lives in Sincelejo) to check on our remaining patient.

The ride back is pleasant, but I start to feel some of the fatigue from all of the excitement of the week.  I also feel a little sad to be leaving our little cardiac ‘family’ for a few days, which is probably crazy considering how much time we’ve all spent together.  I guess it’s because I know it’s just temporary.

Iris and I head back to ‘our’ Cartagena apartment where the neighborhood cat, Ximena is waiting for us.

Now we will relax, write and get ready for the return trip on Tuesday.

* A deliberate elbow to the face was just the beginning of a series of humiliations at a previous facility.

**Pulling on his superman cape when needed.

From news of the weird: Wrong-sided surgery


Admittedly, this is not where I usually look for information on medical quality and safety measures – but this case, as presented in News of the Weird for this week deserves mention:

Neurosurgeon Denise Crute left Colorado in 2005 after admitting to four serious mistakes (including wrong-side surgeries on patients’ brain and spine) and left Illinois several years after that, when the state medical board concluded that she made three more serious mistakes (including another wrong-side spine surgery).

Nonetheless, she was not formally “disciplined” by either state in that she was permitted merely to “surrender” her licenses, which the profession does not regard as “discipline.” In November, Denver’s KMGH-TV reported that Dr. Crute had landed a job at the prestigious Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York, where she treats post-surgery patients (and she informed Illinois officials recently that she is fully licensed in New York to resume performing neurosurgery). [KMGH-TV, 11-4-2012]”

This is an excellent example of the importance of the ‘Time-out” which includes ‘surgical site verification’ among all members of the surgical team.  This also shows some of the limitations in relying on the health care professions to police themselves.  Does this mean that I can absolutely guarantee that this won’t happen in any of the operating rooms I’ve observed?  No – but it does mean that I can observe and report any irregularities witnessed (or deviations from accepted protocols) – such as ‘correct side verification’ or failure of the operating surgeon to review medical records/ radiographs prior to surgery.

It also goes to show that despite lengthy credentialing processes and the reputations of some of the United States finest institutions are still no guarantee of quality or even competence.

What about Leapfrog?

This comes at the same time as the highly controversial Leapfrog grades are released – in which medical giants like UCLA and the Cleveland Clinic received failing marks.  (UCLA received an ‘F” for avoidable patient harm, and the Cleveland Clinic received a “D”.)

Notably, the accuracy of the Leapfrog scoring system has been under fire since it’s inception – particularly since the organization charges hospitals for the right to promote their score.

But then – as the linked article points out – so do most of the organizations ‘touting’ to have the goods on the facilities such as U.S. News and Reports and their famed hospital edition.

Guess there aren’t very many people like me – that feel like that’s a bit of a conflict of interest..

Back in the OR with Dr. Sergio Abello


Clinica Shaio

Spent part of yesterday back in the operating room with Dr. Sergio Abello.  Dr. Abello is an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in foot and ankle surgery.  (He also have a specialized computer system in his office for truly customized orthodics).

Dr. Sergio Abello de Castro, Foot & Ankle Center 

It  was a chance meeting in the hallway, but as always, with the gracious and genial surgeon – it led to the operating room.  He apologized, “it’s just a small case,” but everything went perfectly.

Dr. Sergio Abello (right) with orthopedic resident, Dr. Juan Manuel Munoz

 

Patient was prepped and draped in sterile fashion, with no breaks in sterile technique.  Case proceeded rapidly (previous surgical pins removed).

The was no bleeding or other complications.

Yvonne (left), surgical nurse

Anesthesia was managed beautifully by Claudia Marroqoon, RN – with a surgical apgar of 10.  The patient received conscious sedation and appeared comfortable during the procedure.  There was no hemodynamic instability or hypoxia.  Oxygen saturation 100% for the entire duration of the case.

Photo shoot day 2


In National news today – sure don’t know what those Nicaraguans were thinking to ‘wander’  [ie. smuggle] into Colombian waters and cause an international ‘diplomatic’ incident..

Police found a truck literally full of drugs.. It was a construction vehicle – and when they examined it – it was literally stuffed with drugs that came pouring out when they pierced the body of the truck..

Completely hooked on the ‘El Patron’ series.. My Spanish must be getting better because I can actually distinguish the Medellin accent. Going to have to find a boxed set to bring back home with me since I missed the first season.

Can’t help but love this fabulous city – always something going on – something to see, people to meet and talk to..  (and Bogota loves all its citizens..)

street art

Met some LDS missionaries from California today.. Such nice kids – said they are enjoying the city.

Back in the studio with the fabulous Aj for another dramatic photo shoot.. Two different looks today –   the first is 1920’s theme – aka “Betty Boop

Like I said – I’m not the professional photographer – he’s just nice enough to let me take some pictures while I’m there.. so these are the unretouched, unaltered versions.. He’ll probably do something really fabulous with the ones he took..  I just though y’all would enjoy seeing another facet of my daily life here in Bogotá.

The Betty Boop pout

I have a picture of Aj with the photographer – a great guy named Edgar Bernal.  He has a shop on Calle 64 No 7 – 38 (and a great eye for style.)

Aj gets a touch up – as if perfection needs any help!

One more Betty Boop –

For the next set – more of a traditional 1920’s Bob, if you can call fuchsia traditional.

getting ready

She has such the perfect face for this look –

Then a quick stop – just to pop-in and say hello to German Encino and his wife, Else.. They are the owners (and operators) of a little corner restaurant called the Superdeli on Calle 64 No. 8 -04.  I didn’t stay for lunch this time – but it’s definitely one of my favorites – just a laid back place – good food, nice atmosphere, and nice people..

German Encino and his wife

I do a lot of wandering / exploring/ adventuring around the city – so I end up at different little cafes and kitchens everyday but I wanted to mention Superdeli for a couple of reasons – one – the food is good enough that I’ve come back several times (and the Lulu juice!)  and secondly – they are always friendly and welcoming in a neighborly way – not a ‘hello tourist’ way…

On that note – of wandering – a little advice to fellow wanderers…

If you can see the mountains – you are never really lost..

If you can see the mountains – you are never really lost, and can always find your way home.. The carrera starts at the base of the mountain (carrera 1) – so if you walk a few streets – you’ll hit carrera 7 (septima) which is a main artery for the city..

The calles run in the opposite direction – Calle 1 is in the heart of town (not a particularly nice area but some interesting stuff is located here – like Hospital San Juan de Dios) and heads outwards in both directions..

they only look fierce –

Of course, if you are really LOST – these guys (above) are always happy to help.. Even if you don’t speak Spanish.. (Just keep a note card with your local address on it – it’s also good for taxicabs..)

Had a great day in the operating room today – so I’ll post something tomorrow (with pics)..

Wrapping up and saying “Thanks!”


It’s a busy Sunday in Mexicali – presidential elections are today, so I am going to try to get some pictures of the nearest polling station later.. In the meantime, I am spending the day catching up on my writing..

a polling station in Mexicali

Lots to write about – just haven’t had the time..  Friday morning was the intern graduation which marks the end of their intern year – as they advance in their residencies.. Didn’t get a lot of pictures since I was at the back of the room, and frankly, unwilling to butt ahead of proud parents to get good pics.. This was their day, not mine and I was pleased that I was invited.

I did get a couple of good pictures of my ‘hermanito’ Lalo and Gloria after the event.  (I’ve adopted Lalo as my ‘kid’ brother.. Not sure how he feels about – but he’s pretty easy-going so he probably just thinks it’s a silly gringa thing, and probably it is..)

Dr. ‘Lalo” Gutierrez with his parents

Lalo’s parents were sitting in the row ahead of me, so of course, I introduced myself and said hello.. (They were probably a little bewildered by this middle-aged gringa talking about their son in atrocious Spanish) but I figured they might be curious about the same gringa that posts pictures of Lalo on the internet.. I also feel that it’s important to take time and tell people the ‘good things’ in life.  (Like what a great person their son has turned out to be..)

Same thing for Gloria.. She is such a hard-worker, and yet, always willing to help out.. “Gloria can you help me walk this patient?”  It’s not even her patient, (and a lot of people would say – it’s not our jobs to walk patients) but the patient needs to get out of bed – I am here, and I need some help (with IV poles, pleurovacs, etc.)  and Gloria never hesitates.. that to me – is the hallmark of an excellent provider, that the patient comes first .. She still has several years to go, but I have confidence in her.

She throws herself into her rotations.. When she was on thoracics, she wanted to learn.. and she didn’t mind learning from a nurse (which is HUGE here, in my experience.)

Dr. Gloria Ayala (right) and her mother

She wasn’t sure that her mom would be able to be there – (she works long hours as a cook for a baseball team) but luckily she made it!

Met a pediatric cardiologist and his wife, a pediatrician.. Amazing because the first thing they said is, “We want nurse practitioners in our NICU,” so maybe NPs in Mexico will become a reality.. Heard there is an NP from San Francisco over at Hospital Hispano Americano but haven’t had the pleasure of meeting her.  (I’d love to exchange notes with her.)

I spent the remainder of the day in the operating room of Dr. Ernesto Romero Fonseca, an orthopedic surgeon specializing in trauma.  I don’t know what it is about Orthopedics, but the docs are always so “laid back”, and just so darn pleasant to be around.  Dr. Romero and his resident are no exception.

[“Laid back” is probably the wrong term – there is nothing casual about his approach to surgery but I haven’t had my second cup of coffee yet, so my vocabulary is a bit limited.. ]  Once I finish editing ‘patient bits’ I’ll post a photo..

Then it was off to clinic with the Professor.

Saturday, I spent the day in the operating room with Dr. Vasquez at Hospital de la Familia. He teased me about the colors of the surgical drapes,(green at Hospital de la Familia), so I guess he liked my article about the impact of color on medical photography.  (Though, truthfully, I take photos of surgeons, not operations..)

Since the NYT article* came out a few days ago – things have changed here in Mexicali.  People don’t seem to think the book is such a far-fetched idea anymore.  I’m hopeful this means I’ll get more response from some of the doctors.  (Right now, for every 15 I contact – I might get two replies, and one interview..)

Planning for my last day with the Professor  – makes me sad because I’ve had such a great time, (and learned a tremendous amount) but it has been wonderful.  Besides, I will be starting classes soon – and will be moving to my next location (and another great professor.)

Professor Ochoa and Dr. Vasquez

But I do have to say – that he has been a great professor, and I think, a good friend.  He let me steer my education at times (hey – can I learn more about X..) but always kept me studying, reading and writing.  He took time away from his regular life, and his other duties as a professor of other students (residents, interns etc.) to read my assignments, make suggestions and corrections when necessary.    and lastly, he tolerated a lot with good grace and humor.  Atrocious Spanish, (probably) some outlandish ideas and attitudes about patient care (I am a nurse, after all), a lot of chatter (one of my patient care things), endless questions…  especially, “donde estas?” when I was lost – again.

So as I wrap up my studies to spend the last few weeks concentrating on the book, and getting the last interviews, I want to thank Dr. Carlos Ochoa for his endless patience, and for giving me this opportunity.  I also want to thank all the interns (now residents) for welcoming me on rounds, the great doctors at Hospital General..  Thanks to Dr. Ivan for always welcoming me to the ER, and Dr. Joanna for welcoming me to her hospital.  All these people didn’t have to be so nice – but they were, and I appreciate it.

* Not my article [ I wish it were – since I have a lot to say on the topic].

Hidden Gem returns to Bogota: calling all surgeons!


Calling all Bogotá surgeons – if you missed the first chance to be interviewed for the first edition of Bogotá! a hidden gem guide to surgical tourism – don’t worry..  I’ll be back in the city this September (2012).

While my primary purpose for my return to Bogotá is research-related (I am working on a doctoral degree), I always have time to talk to surgeons about the new and innovative things they are doing in their practices.

Contact me through the site if you are interested..

 

in the operating room with some of Colombia's finest surgeons

in the operating room with some of Colombia's finest surgeons