Miami plastic surgeon tied to multiple deaths


From the Miami Herald comes a terrifying story about a plastic surgery group tied to multiple patient deaths.  The surgical group which operated out of three different south Florida clinics are responsible for at least three deaths, including the recent death of a young woman from West Virginia, Heather Meadows, 29,  who had traveled to south Florida looking for cheap plastic surgery.

bandaid

In addition to this case, come reports that the group housed post-operative patients in a local horse stable.  The clinics; Encore Plastic Surgery in Hialeah, and two Miami clinics; Vanity Plastic Surgery and Spectrum Aesthetics have also been linked with multiple serious medical complications including the case of Nyosha Fowler who was comatose for 28 days after surgeons at the clinic accidentally perforated her intestine and then injected the fecally contaminated fluid into her sciatic nerve during a liposuction/ fat transfer procedure.  Ms. Fowler, who is lucky to be alive, is now permanently disabled and facing a two-million dollar medical bill for the life-saving care she received at an outside facility.

Now, Heather Meadow’s death has been ruled accidental, which is no comfort to her family or the numerous patients harmed by these surgeons. While the state of Florida has reprimanded two of the surgeons in the surgical group in the past, this hasn’t affected their practice, and the surgical clinics continue to accept new patients from across the United States and operate on unsuspecting clients.

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Beauty, at any price?

While Florida state health officials issued an emergency restriction prohibiting one of the group’s surgeons, Dr. Osak Omulepu from operating, no charges have been made despite cell phone photographs documenting horrific conditions at the horse stables where patients were forced to stay while they recuperated from various procedures.  In fact, Dr. Osak Omulepu continues to have four star ratings on several online sites.  His license is listed as active on the Florida Medical Board, with no complaints listed under his profile page.  However, under the disciplinary actions page, there are eight separate listings that do not appear on his general profile.

One of these Complaints, (posted here) related to the death of a 31-year-old woman due to repeated liver perforation during liposuction.  The complaint also cites several other cases against the doctor and notes that Dr. Osak Omulepu is not a board certified plastic surgeon.  In fact, according to the complaints filed in March, the good doctor, holds no certification in any recognized medical specialty.

Related posts:

Plastic surgery safety & Buttloads of Pain

Patient satisfaction scores vs. clinical outcomes: The Yelp! approach to surgery

Is your ‘cosmetic surgeon’ really even a surgeon?

Patient Safety & Medical Tourism

Liposuction in a Myrtle Beach apartment

Reason #6


Reason # 6

Now this Florida story has botched written all over it – from start to finish..  It starts with an insecure man seeking ‘underground’ penile injections from an unlicensed person for penis enlargement.. and from there, it only goes downhill..

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From bad to worse..

After being deformed and defrauded by a scam artist named Nery Gonzalez who offered illegal, and dangerous ‘penile enhancement treatments’, the bargain-seeking Florida resident stumbled into the offices of another incompetent provider,Dr. Mark Schreiber, a plastic surgeon who lost his license several years ago after several botched plastic surgeries following initial investigations in the deaths of two of his patients.

Dr. Mark Schreibermultiple patient deaths, license revoked, but had a nice website

After the death of the second patient (also a penis enlargement case) in 2002, Florida revoked Dr. Schreiber’s license.  In 2008, he went to prison for practicing medicine (and operating on patients) without a license.

In the most recent case, the victim is now deformed, and unable to perform sexually due to his disfigurement.

Source article:

Clary, Michael (2015).  Penis ‘mutilated’ after surgery; ex-Boynton doctor from Tamarac accused.   Sun Sentinel, August 2015.

Related posts:

Just another reason for Latin American Surgery.com

Reason #146 – a cautionary tale

Plastic surgery safety & Buttloads of pain

Cement, Fix-a-flat and Superglue are not beauty aids

Is your surgeon really a doctor?

See the plastic surgery archives for even more articles.

Ebola and medical tourism


 

biohazard

There’s a new editorial over at the IMJT on Ebola, medical tourists and the medical travel industry.  In the article, “Ebola: a hot topic for the next medical tourism event?” by Ian Youngman, he explores the potential pitfalls from medical tourists who are seeking treatment overseas.  As an insurance expert, who makes his living by preparing for “What if?” scenarios, the author offers valuable insight on a topic that has provoked wide speculation and fear-mongering among the general media.

Mr. Youngman explores current medical screening at airports, the impact on current medical tourists as well as the potential impact of a global pandemic/panic on the medical tourism industry.  Mr. Youngman urges for a clear, reasoned and cohesive discussion and response from leaders in the medical tourism industry.

passport w money

Death of young patient raises questions of safety

IN other news, the BBC is reporting on the recent death of a 24 year old British medical tourist.  While the BBC article offers few details on the patient who died during a liposuction procedure in Thailand, a more in-depth report from the UK Mail reports that the woman stopped breathing after receiving anesthesia at the private medical clinic.  The article reports that this was a repeat visit for the patient, who had previously undergone another plastic surgery procedure at the clinic.

Now questions are being raised about the doctor’s qualifications to perform the procedure, as well as the lack of availability of life-saving medical equipment at the medical clinic.  The doctor at the clinic, Dr. Sombob Saensiri has been arrested while this case is being investigated.

Note: There are conflicting reports regarding the exact circumstances of this patient’s death.  An Asian story reports that the patient had returned after a recent surgery with complaints of a developing infection.

Related posts:  Plastic surgery safety archives

Plastic surgery safety: Know before you go radio interview

Is your cosmetic surgeon really even a surgeon?

Liposuction in a Myrtle Beach apartment

 

Days of Summer


cautionary tale for my on-line friends in another botched surgery case in Florida.

Let the buyer beware:

In the most recent case, four individuals have been arrested for impersonating surgeons and operating an unlicensed surgery clinic. According to the media reports, only one of the four people charged is a licensed physician, nurse or other trained healthcare provider – but that didn’t stop them from performing major operations such as liposuction and abdominoplasty procedures on their unknowing patients.  While Dr. William Marrocco* was the doctor on record for the clinic – patients report that he wasn’t the one operating!

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Unlike many of the ‘chop shops” we’ve written about that take place in garages, motels and private ‘parties’, in this scenario, unwary consumers were duped by a savvy group of criminals who had owned and operated the “Health and Beauty Cosmetic Surgery” clinic in downtown West Palm Beach.

*The good doctor Marrocco remains a legally licensed doctor in the state of Florida – though interestingly enough – he does not have prescriptive privileges.  One the Florida Department of Health website, Dr. Marrocco (whose secondary address corresponds with the clinic address) reports active licenses in Virginia, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Indiana and Nebraska.

But let’s check it out… so I did my own preliminary online search –

Virginia: No records found.  No active or past licensees (expired in the last five years) found.  So he may have had one – but not recently.

Pennsylvania: William Charles Marrocco held a license in Pennsylvania for a brief two-year period between 1998 to 2000. This includes his period of medical residency training at Temple University Hospital.

Michigan: Three expired licenses – one for student status (resident) and one as a pharmacist.

Indiana: Dr. Marrocco was a licensed plastic surgeon in the state of Indiana from 2000 to 2011 and has a notation “reinstatement pending‘.  Maybe Dr. Marracco is planning on heading back to Indiana – where his license remains unblemished – despite the scandal surrounding the 2003  death of his wife after he performed liposuction on her).  License # 01052282A

Nebraska:  Expired, license #2909, educational license permit (training) affiliated with Indiana University

Jorge Nayib Alarcon Zambrano – (one of the individuals charged) is listed as a member of the Colombian Society of Plastic Surgeons – from Cali, Colombia.  So he may be a trained surgeon, just not a very good one (and not licensed in the United States).

Licensing isn’t everything..

Kind of goes to show some of the pitfalls of relying on licensing boards for consumer protection.  Dr. William Marrocco was a licensed plastic surgeon, but that’s little consolation for many patients at that West Palm Beach clinic.

In fairness to Dr. William Marrocco, Jorge Alarcon and the other individuals in the case – they have been charged with multiple counts, but have not been convicted of any crime.  Until that time, they remain innocent until proven guilty.

Apologies to my loyal readers for the long lapse in posts but my plate has been pretty full.  But I will be finishing my latest assignment in a few weeks and starting a couple of new projects for the summer months.

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I applied for and received a new assignment from Examiner.com to expand my focus to include more than just health topics.  Now I will be able to write more articles focusing on life and culture in Latin America.

Colombia Moda 2014

To kick-start my new assignment, I have applied to attend Colombia Moda 2014.

(official image from Colombia Moda / Inexmoda)

As many of you already know, I was able to attend last year – and got a fascinating glimpse into the fashion industry and the future of both fashion and consumerism.

Last year’s speakers were promoting the concept of “re-shoring” and changing from the traditional ‘seasonal’ lines and collections to an ongoing, evolving fashion line with new designs and items being designed, developed and sold to the public in shorter mini cycles.

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This year – I’ll be able to cover all of this – along with interviews with individual designers, fashion lines and the Colombian fashion and textile industry.  (Last year, my articles were focused on the role between fashion and plastic surgery).

Fashion is so intrinsic to Colombian life, and many parts of Latin America, so I am really excited about it.  It plays such an important role in the economic, social and an even personal lives of many Colombians.

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I won’t have an assistant this year – but I am getting a new lens for the event (I will be journalist/ photographer for the event).

After Colombia Moda, I will be flipping back and forth between writing about culture and my ‘usual’ medicine and health storylines.

I will be staying in Colombia for several weeks as well as covering the Latin American Association of Thoracics (ALAT) conference at the end of July.   It’s one of the biggest international conferences in thoracic medicine/ surgery with many of the legends of thoracic surgery planning to be in attendance.

Sponsors del Congreso ALAT 2014

In August, I’ll be heading across the globe to interview the head of an innovative surgical program.

I’ll be checking in along the way – and posting photos, interviews and articles as I go.

 

Plastic surgery safety & Buttloads of Pain


Long time readers are familiar with our plastic surgery horror story archives. These archives (mainly) consist of cases of illegal/ unlicensed surgeons and botched plastic surgery procedures but there is also information on how to find a board certified surgeon.  Most of these cases take place in the United States where both clever marketing and underground clinics flourish due to the high costs of plastic surgery.

surgeon clip art

Buttloads of Pain

Now there is a new documentary that explores the dangers of unlicensed operators and ‘booty enhancement’.

Thanks to my friend, Matt Rines for sending me the link to the Vice documentary,”Buttloads of Pain” which talks about and talks to victims of unlicensed (and illegal) gluteal augmentation procedures (such as direct injection of silicone and other substances).

Gluteal Augmentation Procedures

For more information on legitimate gluteal augmentation procedures, read our interviews with licensed plastic surgeons.

Gluteal implants – Interview with Dr. Gustavo Gaspar

Fat transfer : Dr. Luis Botero

Update: February 2014

For readers that have been asking about the background, history and the profound psychological and sociological impact of the ‘big booty’ and other Colombian influences on (global) plastic surgery trends & beauty ideals – this article by Mimi Yagoub at Colombia Reports may be a bit of an eye-opener.

Dr. Ivan Santos

Just another reason for Latinamericansurgery.com


Dr. Ivan Santos

Colombian plastic surgeons operating

because you need someone who is objective (and informed) that is looking out for you, the patient..

In this article, at International Journal of Medical Travel, Kevin Pollard talks about the need for regulation of medical tourism in cosmetic surgery.  I wholeheartedly agree – in fact, Mr. Pollard and I conversed about this very topic in a series of emails last week.

After all – it is why I do what I do, and publish it here for my readers.  The industry does need to be regulated – medical tourism companies shouldn’t pick providers by “lowest bidder” and patients need to be protected (from unsanitary conditions, bad surgeons, and poor care).  But what form will this regulation take?

Will it be Joint Commission certification – which covers facilities and not the physicians (and their surgical practices themselves)?

Will it require facilities to pay a lot of money for a shiny badge?

Or will it be someone like me, low-key and independent, going into facilities at the behest of patients; interviewing surgeons and actually observing the process and talking to patients?

and who pays for this?  The beauty of what I do – is that I am independently (read: self) funded.  True, it hurts my wallet but I have no divided loyalties or outside interests in doing anything but reporting the unvarnished truth.

and ultimately – will this be done in a fair, open and honest way?  Or it is really a witch hunt led by disgruntled American and British plastic surgeons?  Will they bother to discriminate between excellent surgeons and incompetent ones who will it be by geography alone?

I guess we will just have to wait and see.

Is your ‘cosmetic surgeon’ really even a surgeon?


The answer is “NO” for several disfigured patients in Australia, who later found out that a loophole in Australian licensing laws allowed Dentists and other medical (nonsurgeons) professionals to claim use of the title of ‘cosmetic surgeon’ without any formalized training or certification in plastic and reconstructive surgery (or even any surgery specialty at all).

In this article from the Sydney Morning Herald, Melissa Davey explains how dentists and other nonsurgical personnel skirted around laws designed to protect patients from exactly this sort of deceptive practice, and how this resulted in harm to several patients.

As readers will recall – we previously discussed several high-profile cases of similar instances in the United States, including a doctor charged in the deaths of several patients from his medical negligence.  In that case, a ‘homeopathic’  and “self-proclaimed” plastic surgeon, Peter Normann was criminally indicted in the intra-operative deaths of several of his patients.  The patients died while he was performing liposuction due to improper intubation techniques.

But at least, in both of the cases above – the people performing the procedures, presumably, had at a minimum, some training in a medical/ quasi-medical field..

Surgeon or a handyman

More frightening, is the ‘handyman’ cases that have plagued Las Vegas and several other American cities – where untrained smooth operators have preyed primarily on the Latino community – injecting cement, construction grade materials and even floor wax into their victims.

How to protect yourself from shady characters?  In our post, “Liposuction in a Myrtle Beach Apartment” we discuss some of the ways to verify a surgeon’s credentials.  We also talk about how not to be fooled by fancy internet ads and the like.  (Even savvy consumers can be fooled by circular advertisements designed to look like legitimate research articles as well as bogus credentials/ or ‘for-hire’ credentials*. )

*We will talk about some of the sketchy credentials in another post – but the field is growing, by leaps and bounds..More and more fly-by-night agencies are offering ‘credentials’ for a hefty fee (and not much else.)